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  • I'd like to paint my wooden dowel bubble wand. Can you recommend a type of waterproof paint that won't adversely affect the bubble juice?

    Kathy

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    • To be honest, I am not sure. I haven't tried it. But I would think that any paint made for exterior surfaces would be fine once thoroughly dry.

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    • A Fandom user
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  • Edward,

    I am mentoing a group of 6th graders through a STEM focused program.  For their topic of interest they selected investigating bubbles.  We have some bubble experiment books that can lead them through some simple longevity, size, and "self-healing" exercises, and we will probably complete a few of the tests just to give them some level of confidence when manipulating the variables.

    While it is easy to follow a guide and repeat some standard experiments I was wondering if there is something that you think would be particularly beneficial for this wiki.  Some experiment you have on your "to-do" list that is age appropriate 11-12 years old and can be completed with a group of 5 of them, ideally within about an hour from set up to clean up.  Some pre-mix and measuring may be able to be completed prior to this time frame if required.  

    My goal for them would be to complete the experiment, maybe more than once in subsequent weeks and compile the results into a short video clip that could (with permission-still waiting on final word of this) be posted to youtube or even this wiki.

    When questioned, the kids seemed interested in experimenting with colors, size, or longevity of the bubbles.  If you have any suggestions on something that fits this and would like to get something knocked off your to-do list, please let know what you suggest.

    Andy

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    •  

      Andy, I teach STEM to 4th graders, and I had my students compare the circumference  sizes of bubbles made from a variety of bubble recipes. The students used a small wand made from a pipe cleaner, and blew their bubbles directly onto a large white sheet of butcher paper. After each bubble burst, they traced the outline of the bubble on the paper, measured the diameter, and calculated the circumference. They did 3 trials with each recipe and found the average circumference. They also had a partner use a stopwatch to calculate the longevity of each bubble. All results were entered on a data sheet, along with their conclusions/ inferences.

      Kathy

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    • That is a great idea and I might use it next year.  Unfortunately this year is nearly over.  I have one more meeting with them and the current plan is to enjoy it with some KIB action if I can get a trough idea I have been working on to work out.


      I made the mistake of over-reaching and trying to get them to test multiple factors.  The program is  too constrained timewise to investigate three factors (PH, tap vs distilled, and dilution ratio) at once with good note taking and data collection.  So it resulted in fairly useless actual data collection, but the kids had a great time, and have learned a lot about bubbles and the possibilities with them.

      Andy

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    • A Fandom user
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  • Hi Edward, we have never communicated before but I have been using the Wiki for the last few years to improve my giant buubles. This is the first time that I am actually writing in. I have found that my lovely formula has stopped producing super giant bubbles. I have been retesting all my ingredients (degraded peo) and pH and have found nothing wrong except perhaps that the Dawn formula may have changed slightly. Could this be the case? Is anyone else finding a similar reaction with new Dawn?


    I have mixed six batches and am having less than optimal results in low or high humidity, and I called P & G and customer service seemed to hint at the fact that there have been these calls in the last few weeks but no change in formula has been communicated to them. I live in Canada and I am wondering if the formula up here has changed. I'd love to here from anybody else, perhaps I've just lost my touch.


    Thanx,

    a loyal follower of the wiki!

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    • I still didn't find anything, but I can say the new empty bottles have the exact same weight as before. (I've been keeping records of this info).

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    • The conditions have still not been very good where I live for bubbles. In the side-by-side sessions, the new and old Dawn Pros that I have are not performing noticeably differently.

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    • A Fandom user
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  • Love your wiki! I direct people to it regularly for bubbling info. I've been bubbling for several years but have greatly increased my tools and skills starting a few years ago, thanks to this wiki and the SBF group. Time for me to share back a little. :-)

    I have succesfully made a bubble net using trellis netting:  http://amzn.to/1NzMoqY

    I don't have experience yet with any other bubble nets, so I can't compare, but so far I've been really pleased with the trellis netting. I tried first with a piece 17 squares across by 16 squares down, but it seemed to not open up easily enough and tangled too easily. Cut it down to 17 across by 9 down, and it works great! Kids love it, and it sure works better than a large tri-string on low humidity days! I'm planning on trying a 17 x 12 piece very soon. :-)

    Thanks for all your hard work sharing bubble info!

    cheers!

    Jim

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    • The net is so much fun, I'm definitely going to have to try making one out of better material.

      I might rig up a NoDip system some time this summer, and I think a net would be lots of fun with it. I'm thinking that maybe since the trellis netting is so light weight that it might be good for using with a NoDip system? Or do you think I'd still be better off with bamboo yarn or something else with a NoDip system? I'd guess that cotton would not be optimal for a NoDip net setup because of weight and the amount of liquid it would use?

      Bubblenet
      Here's a pic of my trellis net:
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    • A NoDip net setup would be cool. I look forward to hearing how it goes.I have really no idea what would be optimal for such a setup. So, I am eager to hear how it goes.

      Best,

      Edward

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    • A Fandom user
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  • Hi, I built a tri-wand a while back and I use 100% thick cotton rope to hold the solution. However, I built my poles using PVC pipe. At about 8 feet long, it's incredibly difficult to hold the poles up and enjoy the bubbles as I'm struggling to hold the pipes up due to the additional water weight from the solution. I've just gotten wooden dowels, about 8 feet long as well, but I'm worried about the weight issue again. I've yet to take them out and try them as it's too cold.

    Can you recommend light weight poles?

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  • We are big fans of this site and have used many of your recipes with great success.  We are going to try (try being the key word here) to make large bubbles at our kid's Back to School picnic this weekend.  We did it last year and the kids had a blast!  However, the weather is supposed to be in the high 90's.  Is there anything at all we can do to help - any mixture that would work in that high heat?  Of course, we are in a drought so, the humidity is zero!  We'd love to be able to do something for the picninc.  If you have any ideas, or suggestions we'd be truly greatful!  Thank you!

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    • You may want to check out Low_Humidity and also Ideal_Conditions,

      Your best best is a guar gum based mix at high dilution (as noted in the Low Humidity article). But you need to adjust your expectations. Your aren't going to get huge bubbles or long tubes. Depending on the particulates in the air, you may be able to get 3 foot diameter bubbles or slightly larger. I have made bubbles in 100F weather and 20% humidity but also struck out with bubbles at 80F and 60% humidity. I've also had miserable fails with the same mix at 100F.

      It is worth a try but be prepared for things not to work out.

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    • Yep, not gurantees in life - or bubbles!  thanks for your advice and for the great recipes/website! 

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    • Let me know how it works out.

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    • A Fandom user
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  • Requesting info on common names for some of these polymers/goo, where they can be purchased and an idea of costs please. I'm trying to get my 7 year old twins and their 5 year old brother interested iieln science. thank you Danielintheden

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    • See Ingredients and the articles that it links to. You will find the answers there.

      Also be sure to look at the Site Index to find the many topics on the wiki that touch on the related science. Also, don't miss Bubble Juice Basics

      Lastly, don't forget about the Search capabilities of the wiki. There is a lot of information here -- sometimes you may have to look for it.

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    • A Fandom user
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  • Hey Ed thank you for being here Ur recipes helped me a lot I'm doing Giants in a very hot place (Israel) Still can't figure out which works best But doing well with guar Any tips?

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    • Part of the problem is that many items that flouresce have one or more of the following issues:

      • - stain clothing or surfaces (even if subtly)
      • - expensive
      • - interfere with the success of the bubble solution
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    • I was thinking about taking a stick light and trow it over the still closed wands with ribbon formed I will tell u if it works Yea this hobby is time consuming....

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    • A Fandom user
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  • Hi Edward - I've written out what I think is a decent overview of how I'll proceed with the testing we spoke about. Mind taking a look and suggesting any edits, a;ternate processes, or additional testing measures you can think of?

    Hard Water Experimentation

    Thanks!

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    • A Fandom user
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  • Hi there!

    You wrote:

    "April 2015, we are hoping to find a lab willing to measure the surface tension of various solutions in the hopes of exploring this more thoroughly"

    We will have a science project with kids, starting next term. The overall topic will be "surfaces", bubbles will play a major part, I would like them to make experiments and measurements - are you still interested in getting your surface tensions measured? How many solutions?

    Greetings,

    Christina

    Verein Technologykids (Austria)

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    • Dear Edward

      going further, counting drops - how many drops can fit on a 1cent coin? (diameter 1,61 cm = 5/8 inch) This might be a good methode for you to estimate differences in surface tension.

      aqua dest. 20 +-0,7

      1:25 Fairy 11 +-1,4

      1:10 Fairy 10 +- 0,9

      guar gum mix approx. 1:25 Fairy  17 +-1,1 - its aged (1 week) and quite viscouse - interesting!

      Home made foaming test - srewcap tube 30 ml, 5ml liquid, 1 marble, shake and count to ten, amazing differences in the foam formed (volume, layers of hexagonal or spherical foam, change of foam in time) I 'd like you to try something like that with your bubble juices!

      Best,

      Chrisi

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    • Hi Chrisi,

      Are you going to have access again to the surface tension measuring equipment? I'd be interested to know if you get similar results with your 1:25 water and Fairy and 1:25 water, Fairy and guar gum. I'd also be curious about the surface tension of of 1:25 PEO solution.

      The reason for doing this is to see if the drops on a penny method is strictly measuring surface tension or if adhesion or some other factor is coming into play. I had confounding results a few years ago and was unsure why.

      I explored the drops on a penny method a few years ago. At the time, there were a few issues. One issue was that there was a fair amount of variation with trials of the same solution--so it proved very time-consuming to peform trials. And there were some surprising results where the surface tension would have been expected to be the same but resulted in different numbers of drops. The other was that I had no way of calibrating it to a meaningful standard. So that while I could kind of compare the relative surface tension of solutions, I couldn't translate it to meaningful units -- I was hoping to use the results in some calculations.

      It would be interesting to see if you get the same results with that guar juice of yours compared to the water/Fairy as you did with the drop test.

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